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Intent, Implementation and Impact for English 
Curriculum Intent Curriculum Implementation Curriculum Impact

· For pupils to be able to read, write, spell, speak and listen at age appropriate levels and following age-related expectations (see whole school progression for reading, writing, speaking and listening to see all age related expectations)

 

 · For pupils to be exposed to a variety of good quality literature, genres and authors.

 

 · For pupils to write for a variety of purposes and audiences; clearly, accurately and coherently, adapting their language and style as required.

 

 · To create a positive reading and writing culture in school, where both are promoted, enjoyed and considered ‘a pleasure’ for all pupils.

 

 · For pupils to be confident when writing and read easily, fluently and with good understanding.

 

· For pupils to develop an understanding of grammar and punctuation and to acquire a wide vocabulary and to use these appropriately.

 

 · For pupils to develop a love of reading for pleasure, as well as for information, by reading widely and often.

 

 · For pupils to acquire strategies to enable them to become independent learners in English (spelling rules and patterns and how to tackle unfamiliar words when reading).

 

· Pupils to take pride in their writing, to use joined, neat handwriting and present their work to a high standard.

 

 · For pupils to enter into discussion and to present their ideas to each other by talking, being able to elaborate and explain themselves clearly, make presentations and participate in debates.

 

· For pupils to be confident when speaking to different audiences, including presentations to small groups, the class or whole school assembly - speaking clearly and audibly.

 

· For pupils to actively listen to others – showing an interest and making appropriate and engaging responses.

· For pupils to be able to follow multi-step instructions by listening.

 

· For pupils to ask relevant questions to extend their understanding and knowledge.

 

· For pupils to use a broad and rich vocabulary to discuss a wide variety of topics

 

· For pupils participate in a wide variety of role play / drama using an appropriate register and tone.

 

· Children who are significantly below expected levels to receive interventions and booster sessions in order to close the gap.

 

 · All children to make at least expected progress in reading, writing, speaking and listening.

· All pupils to receive a high quality, well planned daily English lesson.

 

· Units of work to be planned that use well written and engaging whole class books and make cross-curricular links to stimulate discussion and give meaningful contexts to writing.

 

· For pupils to read and write daily.

 

 · For pupils in EYFS and KS1 to have daily phonics sessions, following Letters and Sounds.

 

· For Year 2-6, to use Oxford Owl (Read, Write Inc) spelling scheme, delivering 4 to 5 sessions per week.

 

· Pupils to have Spelling log books and ‘try out’ books.

 

·  Pupils to have Home/School record books in which they can record their reading in school and at home. Children expected to read 5 times a week at home and have the H/S book signed by an adult.

 

 · Spellings to be sent home weekly in Home/School record books and practiced using look, cover, write, check method. Spellings to be tested regularly in school.

 

· Guided Reading sessions to take place regularly in all classes so that every child works with the class teacher once a week.

 

 · For all pupils to have an age appropriate reading book which they bring to school and take home every day. Pace of reading, suitability of book and genre to be monitored by the class teacher.

 

 · For pupils to be encouraged to read for pleasure – inviting book corners, well stocked school and class libraries, book fair, author visits, reading buddies, ‘author of the month’, shared (family) reading every half term etc.

 

 · Pupils to use ‘talk for writing’ to discuss ideas with each other prior to writing.

 

· Working Walls – all classes to have an English display to aid pupils with reading and writing techniques, spelling and grammar.

 

 · Vocabulary – displays in class, all curriculum areas, to have vocabulary displayed. Vocabulary mats to be used. Thesauruses and dictionaries to be easily accessible for pupils to use.

 

 

 

· Pupil progress meetings with Headteacher, SENDCo and teachers each term ensure different groups and individual progress is monitored and interventions organised to support progress.

· Intervention sessions enable a greater proportion of pupils to be on track to meet year group expectations or in the case of those working significantly below expectations to make better than expected progress.

 

· Subject leader provides an action plan for the subject and addresses areas for development and improvement annually.

 

· Subject leader conducts learning walks, lesson observations, pupil interviews and book monitoring throughout the year. These inform future areas for improvement and the impact of new initiatives.

 

· Nfer tests in Reading are used in Year 3, 4 and 5 (the classes that do not do SATs) in Autumn and Summer terms to inform progress.

 

· Youngs Spelling test is done in September from years 2,3,4,5 and 6. This is repeated in February and June for children below their chronological spelling age.

 

· Post 2016 SATS papers are used in year 6 to monitor progress. These are done in November, February and April as ‘mock SATS’.

 

· Teachers track pupils’ progress using Target Tracker each half term in Reading and Writing. This informs planning and any intervention needed.

 

· Teachers moderate pupils work in school and in cluster meetings with other schools to ensure accurate assessments are made.

 

· A variety of writing opportunities to be created in each unit of work – ensuring covering different genres and also ensuring children write independently and at length.

 

· Teachers to plan different writing styles into other curriculum areas.

 

· Work to be differentiated, scaffolded and supported as required and needed.

 

 · Teachers and TAs to support ALL pupils on a regular basis; providing intervention, support and challenge that individuals require to advance their learning in all areas of English.

 

 · Grammar and Punctuation to be taught alongside and within units of work.

 

· Teachers and TAs model reading, planning writing, writing and handwriting.

 

· Teachers read aloud regularly to their class using a variety of high quality texts.

 

· Editing and proof reading skills are modelled by adults and used by the children.

· Displays of writing to encourage pride in work, give a purpose and audience and to show that work is valued.

 

· Next steps marking to be used, using Two Stars and a Wish, for longer pieces of work (see marking policy). Pupils are given regular writing targets (wishes) which are followed up in subsequent pieces of writing.

 

· Handwriting to be taught following Nelson scheme. Joined writing to be taught in KS2 (or end Y2 for some children)

 

 · To encourage and promote enjoyment in reading and writing, events take place often throughout the year. These include: World Book Day, library visits, visitors to assemblies, author/poet visits, Book Fairs and ‘Shared Reading’ sessions where parents are invited.

 

· Pupils given opportunity at least once per term to show off their reading, writing, speaking and listening in celebration assemblies – to which parents and grandparents are invited.

 

·  Each year data is analysed and any areas for improvement identified and addressed. These are often included on the School Improvement Plan and English

Action Plan.

· Pupils enjoy reading regularly, for information and for enjoyment/pleasure.

 

 · Pupils discuss books with excitement and interest.

 

 · Pupils enjoy writing and can use the features of different genres and styles. They can write for different purposes and audiences.

 

 · Pupils are proud of their writing.

 

· Pupils know that others value their writing; they see it on display, made into class books, shared in assemblies.

 

· Skills progress (grammar and punctuation) throughout the school is evident in children’s books.

 

 · Pupils are being adventurous with vocabulary choices.

 

 · Writing across the curriculum is the same standard as in English books.

 

 · There is evidence of editing and redrafting in children’s books.

· A range of genres are taught across the school (progressing in difficulty) resulting in pupils being exposed to, and knowledgeable about, literary styles, authors and genres. Pupils  can express preferences and give opinions, supported by evidence, about different texts.

 

 · Next steps marking is evident; providing positive support and directing the pupil on their next steps to improve their writing.

 

 · Pupils respond to feedback by initialling and implementing next steps into writing.

 

· Pupils use classroom resources to support their learning.

 

 · Pupils presentation is of a high standard through following the school’s handwriting policy.

 

· Pupils are confident, articulate and possess a broad and rich vocabulary when speaking in small groups, 1:1 or in front of a larger audience. They can actively listen, follow multi-step instructions and ask relevant questions.

 

· Pupils feel confident to explore characters using drama and are able to perform in front of an audience using an appropriate register and volume.

 

· Pupils’ work is of a progressively high standard as they go through the school and is of the same standard as their peers in other similar schools.

 

· Standards being met at the end of EYFS, Phonics Screening Check, KS1 and KS2 are broadly in line with local and national averages.

Curriculum Progression Reading

Curriculum Progression Writing

Curriculum Progression Speaking and Listening 

 

Phonics

In school, we follow the DfE approved Phonics Bug Club Reading Book Scheme for the teaching of phonics. 

The Terminology

 

phoneme is the smallest unit of sound in a word. It is generally accepted that most varieties of spoken English use about 44 phonemes. 

 

grapheme is a symbol of a phoneme. It is a letter or group of letters representing a sound. 

 

Segmenting consists of breaking words down into phonemes to spell. Blending consists of building words from phonemes to read. 

Both skills are important. 

 

Digraph - this is when two letters come together to make a phoneme. For example, /oa/ makes the sound in ‘boat’ and is also known as a vowel digraph. There are also consonant digraphs, for example, /sh/ and /ch/. 

 

Trigraph - this is when three letters come together to make one phoneme, for example /igh/. 

 

Split digraph - a digraph in which the two letters are not adjacent – e.g. make 

 

Abbreviations - VC, CVC, and CCVC are the respective abbreviations for vowel-consonant, consonant-vowel-consonant, consonant-consonant-vowel-consonant, and are used to describe the order of graphemes in words (e.g. am (VC), Sam (CVC), slam (CCVC), or each (VC), beach (CVC), bleach (CCVC). 

Phase 1

Phase 1 concentrates on developing children's speaking and listening skills and lays the foundations for the phonic work which starts in Phase 2. The emphasis during Phase 1 is to get children attuned to the sounds around them and ready to begin developing oral blending and segmenting skills. Phase 1 is divided into seven aspects. 

 

Each aspect contains three strands: 

 

· Tuning in to sounds (auditory discrimination) 

 

· Listening and remembering sounds (auditory memory and sequencing) 

 

· Talking about sounds (developing vocabulary and language comprehension) 

Phase 2

In Phase 2, letters and their sounds are introduced one at a time. A set of letters is taught each week, in the following sequence.

 

Set 1: s, a, t, p 

 

Set 2: i, n, m, d 

 

Set 3: g, o, c, k 

 

Set 4: ck, e, u, r 

 

Set 5: h, b, f, ff, l, ll, ss 

 

The children will start to learn to blend and segment to help them begin to read and spell. This starts with simple words. 

 

Words using set 1

at

sat

pat

sat

sap

Words using set 1 and 2

(+i)

 (+n)

 (+m)

 (+d)

it

is

sit

pit

pip

sip

tip

an

in

nip

pan

pin

tan

nap

tin

am

man

mat

map

Pam

Tim

Sam

dad

sad

dim

din

did

Sid

and

dip

Words using set 1-3:

(+g)

 (+o)

 (+c)

 (+k)

tag

gag

gig

gap

nag

sag

gas

pig

dig

got

on

not

pot

top

dog

tot

pop

mog

can

cot

cop

cap

cat

cod

kid

kit

Kim

Ken

Words using set 1-4

(+ck)

(+e)

(+u)

(+r)

kick

sock

sack

dock

pick

sick

pack

tuck

get

pet

ten

net

pen

peg

met

men

up

mum

run

mug

cup

sun

mud

 

rim

rip

ram

rat

rag

rug

rot

Words using set 1-5: 

(+h)

(+b)

(+f and ff)

(+l and ll)

(+ss)

had

him

his

hot

hut

hop

hum

hit

hat

has

hack

but

big

back

bet

bad

bag

bed

bud

beg

bug

bun

of

if

off

fit

fin

fun

fig

fog

puff

huff

cuff

lap

let

leg

lot

lit

bell

fill

doll

tell

sell

Bill

less

hiss

mass

mess

boss

fuss

hiss

pass

kiss

Tess

 

Alongside this, children are introduced to tricky words. These are the words that are irregular. This means that phonics cannot be applied to the reading and spelling of these words. 

 

The tricky words introduced in phase 2 are: 

to

the

no

go

I

Phase 3 

By the time children reach Phase 3, they will already be able to blend and segment words containing the 19 letters taught in Phase 2. Over the twelve weeks which Phase 3 is expected to last, twenty-five new graphemes are introduced (one at a time). 

 

Set 6: j, v, w, x 

 

Set 7: y, z, zz, qu 

 

Consonant digraphs: ch, sh, th, ng 

 

Vowel digraphs: ai, ee, igh, oa, oo, ar, or, ur, ow, oi, ear, air, ure, er 

 

Sounds

Word example

j

jam

v

vet

w

win

x

box

y

yes

z

zip

zz

buzz

qu

quick

ch

chop

 

 

Sounds

Word example

sh

shin

th

thick

ng

song

ai

train

igh

sight

oa

boat

oi

coil

oo (long)

boot

ee

tree

 

Sounds

Word example

oo (short)

cook

ow

now

ar

star

air

hair

ear

hear

er

term

ur

curl

or

fork

ure

pure

Tricky words: 

we

me

be

was

no

go

my

you

they

her

all

are

Phase 4 

By Phase 4, children will be able to represent each of 42 phonemes with a grapheme. They will blend phonemes to read CVC words and segment CVC words for spelling. They will also be able to read two syllable words that are simple. They will be able to read all the tricky words learnt so far and will be able to spell some of them. This phase consolidates all the children have learnt in the previous phases 

 

Tricky words: 

said

so

she

he

have

like

some

come

were

there

little

one

they

all

are

do

when

out

what

my

her

 

 

 

Phase 5

Children will be taught new graphemes and alternative pronunciations for these graphemes, as well as graphemes they already know. They will begin to learn to choose the appropriate grapheme when spelling. 

 

New graphemes for reading: 

 

Sound

Word example

Sound

Word example

Sound

Word example

Sound

Word example

ay

day

oy

boy

wh

when

a_e

make

ou

out

ir

girl

ph

photo

e_e

these

ie

tie

ue

blue

ew

new

i_e

like

ea

eat

aw

saw

oe

toe

o_e

home

 

au

Paul

u_e

rule

Phase 6 

In phase 6, the children are introduced to some more unusual alternative graphemes but the focus is on learning spelling rules for word endings (these are known as suffixes). The children will learn how words change when you add certain letters. For example: 

 

-s -es -ing -ed 

 

-er -est -y -tion 

 

-ful -ly -ment -ness 

Phonics at home 

  • It is important for a child to learn lower case or small letters rather than capital letters at first. Most early books and games use lower case letters and your child will learn these first at school. Obviously you should use a capital letter when required, such as at the beginning of the child's name, eg. Paul
  • When you talk about letters to your child, remember to use the letter sounds: a buh cuh duh e ... rather than the alphabet names of the letters: ay bee see dee ee . The reason for this is that sounding out words is practically impossible if you use the alphabet names. eg. cat, would sound like: see ay tee 
  • When saying the sounds of b, d, g, j and you will notice the 'uh' sound which follows each, for example buh, duh... You cannot say the sound without it, however, try to emphasise the main letter sound. 
  • Encourage your child to sound words out. Sound talk by pointing to fingers in turn – one finger for each sound e,g ch i n = 3 fingers s c are = 3 fingers 

Useful webpages 

http://www.phonicsplay.co.uk